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hostess our father in law the angelica van buren is white house hostess for her father in law. law school ork review and the new york law school racial justice private hosted a series of panel discussions on civil society and the writings of dr. seuss. the popular children's book author. topics included shared interests in society. this is an hour and 25 minutes. >> good morning. >> good morning. my job here is to introduce the first panel. i would like to also welcome you all. anm delighted to be part of event that looks at the relationship between law the popular culture. there is a deep and abiding connection. we gain insights, as we will see today will move back and forth. i will introduce the members of the first panel. starting with anne mcgillivray view is a professor of law at the university of manitoba. come on up. courses include crime, law, and society. she has written a book called "black eyes all the time." she has also written "he would have made a wonderful solicitor in dracula." naomi mezey is a professor of law at georgetown university law center. she is an award winning
. schoolnew york law repute and racial justice project recently hosted panel discussions on civil society and the writings of dr. seuss. topics included shared interest in society. this is one hour and 25 minutes. >> good morning. introduce the to first panel. i would like to also welcome you all. i am delighted to be part of an event that looks at the relationship between law the popular culture. there is a deep and abiding connection. wii gain insights, as we will see today will move back and forth. i will introduce the members of the first panel. mcgillivrayh anne view is a professor of law at the university of manitoba. come on up. courses include crime, law, and society. is written a book called "black ."es all the time is also written "he would have ine a wonderful solicitor dracula." omi mezey is a professor of university lawwn center. she is an award winning feature. she is known for her interdisciplinary works on law and culture, particularly popular culture. jorge contreras is an associate professor of law at the washington college of law. he comes from a science background. he
and congress back in 1968 actually made them the law of the land, but they don't apply to 40% of the gun sales today. something like 58,000 gun dealers across this country, three times the number of mcdonald's stores, as a matter of fact, there are gun stores every place in this country, and those gun sellers -- they do background checks on all their clients. i think last year 78,000 times the government found reasons to deny people a permit to get a gun based on either they were criminals or they had mental problems. if that doesn't tell you that this is a real problem but good checks can really do something, i don't know what would. >> let me ask you about in new york the nra has filed a suit to try to defeat some of these gun control measures which are more robust than what the federal government is talking about within the states that are about magazines, about background checks and assault weapons. how do you react to that? >> well, anybody has the right to go to court and sue over anything. and in new york lots of people do that every single day. but the supreme court, which is the one t
at dearborn law-enforcement association. thank you for inviting me to speak to you about the use of unmanned aircraft a small colorado community where he lives. the mesa county sheriff's office is a middle sized of a 200 people at the patrol chamber 65 deputies. this are approximately 175,000 citizens to the infiniti 3300 square-mile county. we see a wide range for petty offenses to major crime including drug trafficking and homicide. in four years with lumbar operational hours than anyone else in the country with 185 and over 40 missions. the two small battery operated aircraft systems that's a lot considering this one on the table here is a backpack size helicopter that can fly for 15 minutes and weighs two pounds. our smaller plane can fly for an hour and weighs just about eight pounds. both systems are used to carry canvas which are commercially available. in fact coming committee same camera at wal-mart. have a tissue at the brief examples of how we use this equipment. my first example occurred last may when an historic church cup higher. recruited from a camel which allowed us to show
into law. we will be taking that up with the "a-team." angela mcglowan, james toronto and doug schoen. our first guest is here to evaluate obama's middle east tour. today's focus on the enormous price on jordan as a result of the syrian civil war. joining me now is judith miller and quivered clifford may. it is a very big positive impression with this to her, if not a concrete result. >> it was an extraordinary tour. the israelis called it a thermo nuclear charm offensive. talk about a restart in a relationship that was crying out. basically the president figured out do you attract more bees with honey in a country like israel who did everything he had to do to put a relationship on course. lou: wasn't he inconsistent to be talking about peace in the middle east? at the same time that he was threatening bashar al-assad and a wrong? >> yes, but they are both provocative. they are both belligerent. they are destabilizing forces and have been for years. he understands that the israelis are reliable allies, valuable allies in many ways. they are in a difficult neighborhood. the israelis, two y
. angelica van buren is the white house hostess for her father-in- law, president martin van buren, who was a widower. we will include your comments and questions tonight live at 9 eastern on c-span and c-span3. also on c-span radio and c- span.org. >> former defense department on ail jeh johnson targeted killings overseas. administration faces questions over that legal rationale of that operation. this is just under an hour. >> good morning. it is a pleasure to welcome you here today to new york's never ending winter. glad to see you could get up so early and break your way here. we are very excited about today's conference. first, i want to give a few banks. , directorthank susan of the center on national security here at fordham for her work in putting together this conference with me. it is god'sine work, so we have done that as well as everything else. today we are looking at 21st century warfare law, the enemy, and the battlefield. andthe work of the center fort the other national security center law school, basically this is what we have been looking at for 12 years. legale been
. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise in support of yucca mountain which by law is designated as the site for permanent geological repository for our nation's spent nuclear fuel. last year the president's blue ribbon commission on america's nuclear future issued a report but barred from even evaluating the merits of yucca mountain, despite the fact that it has been approved in a bipartisan basis by congress and signed into law by the president -- actually reaffirmed by signing of the law in 2002, the initial law was passed in 1982, and the law was amended in 1987 which in a bipartisan manner passed thue both chambers, signed by -- through both chambers, signed by different presidents, established that yucca mountain would be the repository for our nuclear spent fuel. what the blue ribbon commission did say was any host community should expect incentives. that commitment is no different from nevada when it comes to yucca mountain, and good news. the local county is consenting and ready to negotiate with the department of energy. in advance of yucca mountain even receiving its first deliver
. >> ifill: today's supreme court arguments pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registration bill. the case explores the extent of state powers against the controversial backdrop of voting restrictions. arizona's proposition 200 requires state residents to provide either a driver's license, passport, birth certificate or physical proof of citizenship before they can vote. but an existing federal law requires only a sworn statement of citizenship on a voter registration form. supporters say the arizona measure cuts down on voter fraud by keeping noncitizens from voting. but opponents argue the law unfairly tarring hes minorities, immigrants, and the elderly. the case is only the most recent dispute between arizona and the federal government related to immigration issues. over the summer, the supreme court upheld part of a top state law that allowed police to check for immigration papers. other states, including alabama, georgia, kansas and tennessee, have similar laws on the books and a number of other states are also considering comparable measures. the obama administration s
, because of dishonor. i'm asking the holy spirit to teach me the law of honor. i've always been taught to be polite and to be gracious. you can have behavior... from a heart that has no honor. you can learn how to say nicey words to people and still not have a heart of honor. honor protects. honor corrects. honor submits. honor yields. honor is willing to listen. honor. your reaction to an instruction from your boss reveals your understanding of honor. something as simple as opening the car door for a lady reveals your code of honor. something as small as taking care of your elderly mother... is the proof of honor. i can create through honor what i cannot create with knowledge and intelligence. and what i lack in experience and what i don't have financially i can create through the code of honor. honor is a seed that will outlast my lifetime. if no one taught you how to honor someone because of their achievements, and there're seven reactions that reveal honor. your reaction to greatness. your reaction to the weakness of another. your reaction to pain. i wanna know your code of honor.
have no budget from the president, in violation of the law. he gets his ncaa bracket in on time but still no budget. this is the fourth time in five years. he set a new record this year, two months with no plan, while we had trillion-dollar deficits and a debt crisis on the horizon. his party leaders, unfortunately, failing offering a serious account of our challenge. no serious plan to grow our economy or create jobs. no plan to ever balance the budget. take more. trillions of dollars more to spend more in washington. that's what got us in this mess in the first place. so what can be done? the good news is that we now have a vehicle for regular order. the democrats derailed the budget process each of the last few years and stopped governing when they stopped budgeting. at least we now have a budget process that's moving. we brought them back in the game this spring. that's a good thing. so what's going to happen in the weeks ahead? well, we will make the case for our priorities. whether the gentleman from maryland wants to acknowledge it or not, we have divided government. the
'm going home and there is people all the time up in there educating myself about the law, i know is fast to get in there, but when the wheels are turned to come home, it's slow. i couldn't accept it. people are like they are going to do this to time. i said no, this is clear. this was what was supposed to have been done from the beginning. even my families, my loved wupz ones that lost. that made me fight more. i never gate gave up my fate. my hope is restored. >> with that i would like to thank all of our panelist. thank you. [ applause ] and we are now going to move to our second panel. while they take their seats, this idea of forced treatment versus constitutional rights has always been a tension that we've had in our criminal justice system. there is an issue that came up earlier this year that you may have read about involving this implementation of a court that was supposed to treat individuals who were suffering from long-term alcoholism. and the court was set up in a way where individuals were not being arrested for a crime but instead were being jailed for contempt of court a
benefits as couples. in fact, bill clinton who signed doma into law when he was president, is now asking the u.s. supreme court to overturn it. let's bring in cnn legal contributor powell cowen. how much will the reversal potentially make? >> supreme court justices would tell you they're immune from politicians lobbying them. they're appointed for life by the president, and the founding fathers frankly set up the system so you would have sort of an independent judiciary. i don't think bill clinton's position will have a major impact on the court. >> so what the constitutional argument that will be made to keep doma in place? >> well, there are two cases before the court this week. one on tuesday and one on wednesday. the first on tuesday is called the prop 8 case. california case, and it's very interesting because the california supreme court said gay marriage is legal. they said it's against the california constitution to ban it. and then lawyers came in and voters went out and they adopted prop 8, which amended the california constitution to make it illegal. so they stuck it to the jud
television. nbc's kristin welker has more on that from the white house. >> reporter: with stiffer gun laws facing an uncertain future in congress, new york mayor michael bloomberg squared off against national rifle association's ceo wayne la pierre on "meet the press" today. >> i think i've spent $12 million on running ads. >> he can't buy america. >> tell didn't don't protect criminals. >> reporter: bloomberg announced a $12 million campaign aimed at convincing swing senators to support universal background checks. >> i've owned a gun all my life and i'll fight for my right to keep it. background checks have nothing to do with taking guns away from anyone. >> reporter: bloomberg's strategy -- create a counterweight to the nra, harnessing the groundswell of support for tougher laws in the wake of the newtown tragedy. >> 90% of the public wants something and their representatives vote against that. common sense says they are going to have a price to pay for that. >> he he's going to find out this is a country of the people, by the people and for the people and he can't spend enough of his $
requiring all voters to show photo i.d. in order to vote. a measure that opponents of that law say would suppress the vote, particularly among minority, elderly and young voters. joining me now, msnbc's joy reid. joy, michael steele said, look, you can't say this on monday and pass these kinds of things. this is part of what's alienating those voters. >> absolutely. apparently, the governor's and legislatures out there in the world didn't get the memo from nice reince priebus. the problem with these laws, lawrence, they are far more likely to disenfranchise black and hispanic youth, something like 72% of african-americans who go to vote are asked for i.d. something like 760% of hispanics, but half of white younger people who go to vote. so you're disenfranchising people directly and black and hispanic youth are far more likely to report not voting because either they don't have the i.d. or are perceived or think they don't have the i.d. so on one hand, we're going to speak more nicely to minorities, but as a back up, we're going to make it harder for them to vote. >> and joy, there's ten
to implement lawyer's law which consist of outpatient treatment. it was named after laura wilcox, a mental health worker who had been shot to death by a man who refused treatment. the county r remains the only county to implement the law. there have been other counties in los angeles county and other counties who are considering it. >> why have they not adopted the law. what is it about forced treatment and the consequences for an allowing refusing treatment. we have a panel who have a knowledge of this subject in some cases because of their professional endeavors and in some cases because of personal experiences and in some cases, both. let me introduce them. karen chen is an attorney manager for the san francisco public defenders office, kathy, whose son battled mental illness, can is a subject treatment expert for the medical center. danny is the associate director for the serial neeb breet program for the city of san diego. and san francisco chief of police. gary is a psychiatrist and laura's law advocate and eduardo vega of the mental health association of san francisco. let me start
cake and candles, the birthday bash for obama care t president's health care law turning 3ears old. and the ft couldn't be happier. >> it's helped us honor our promise of life, liberty and pursuit of happiness. >> but as democrats party we're unwrapping more costs hidden in the health care law, a gift now standing 67 inches high, taller than the president when you pile on all of the new regulations. cashen in crashing the party right now. >> hello everybody. i'm eric boling. wayne rogers, jonathan and tracy all joining us this week. welcome everybody. don't crack the bubbly yet. it's three years since president obama signed owe bbama care. boy, is it starting to get messy. that's not republicans declaring it messy. that's one of the architects of the law saying it. watch. >> i think we know it'soing to be messy. there's going to be things that come up that are unanticipated. >> he's right. we bought this cake the woman there said you know what, obama care, that's why my hours got cut. i guess we can expect more of that. >> you are going to see a lot more of that. this is one exampl
-paying position and if they went to law school they go to corporate law and may be bored to tears but want to do it for five to ten years to get the money to then be able to do their passion and that is the difference. when i wrote passages in the 1970s, the most famous business book and remains today what color is your parachute and the thesis was starch out following your passion. who can afford to do that as of 25-year-old who has finished college? they have to work and get some -- takes a decade to take -- pay off those college loans unless they came from a wealthy family. the other thing that i think is a big advance is the blue regeneration which was the generation that inherited the feminist revolution was 80% white. the generation of young people today is far more diversified and there are a lot of young african-american, asian-american, indian american, hispanics who voted for obama or very much responsible for the reelection of obama and are helping to mentor younger poor women which were left out of the first feminist revolution. poor women really didn't have a lot to do for them or e
duck for two months over the summer was that under the campaign finance laws, he couldn't use money that he'd already raised until after he received the nomination for president in august. i believe that our primary process is way too long. i think our calendar needs to be looked at. i think our debate calendar needs to be shrunk. i think we had way too many debates with candidates slicing and dicing each other, and i think they had to wait too long to get to the convention. i'm calling for a convention in june or july. we're going to set up a commission that's going to make that decision. i'm going to be a part of that. i'm going to chair that commission. ut no more august conventions. scommoip we're taking republican thoughts on those changes that reince priebus was talking about. give us a call. the phone numbers, we'll put up for you. we're doing our lines regionally for republicans just in this first segment of the "washington journal" tosmede a few other stories that are out there -- obama to pick tom perez for labor. that's the headline of the politico story this morning. pre
a scandal. in the next administration, angelico van buren is the hostess for her father-in-law, martin van buren, who is a wood door. -- widower. tonight, on c-span. >> last week the senate veterans affairs committee held a hearing on veterans mental health care and the need for assuring timely access to care. the hearing heard testimony from two panels, including mental health specialists and military veterans advocates. according to the veterans affairs committee chair, veterans are committing suicide at a rate of more than 8003 year and he urged the affairs department to increase the hiring rate for mental health clinicians. [gavel] of thethis hearing saturn -- senate veterans' affairs committee is beginning. i want to start by thanking our wonderful panelists for their years of experience in the important areas they are discussing with us today. i want to thank the va for being here as well. know, it isk we all 10 years with the united states went to war in iraq, went to war in afghanistan before that. what we have learned in a variety of ways is that the cost of those wars has been ve
? if you guys get over the racism, it is the law. get over it. the people who killed the people interact, it is the law. -- in iraq. host: what is the affordable care act have to do with racism ? caller: it has a lot to do with racism, taking her -- taking care of people -- we should cut the healthcare for the congress. see how they like it. we will move onto clay in biloxi, mississippi. caller: good morning. disabilityd and on after working 14 years, the five years of court reporting. we had a bombardment of advertisements for simple move -- healthcare for medicare. we find it replaces the medicare policy we currently have. after the deadline passed for the supplements, humana stopped advertising in mississippi. you can't get in touch with humana. the bureaucracy is just going to increase and as leaving the poor tople at a disadvantage correct and try to make reasonable choices for their healthcare. thank you for taking my call. host: a statement put out yesterday by the office of house democratic -- released following the statement today in recognition of the third anniversary of the a
governor andrew cuomo wants to ease restriction option his just passed gun control law. the measure been as the sale of gun magazining holding less than seven bullets. he says it's unworkable since there is no seven rounds of magazine. so he wants a sale of clips holding up to ten rounds but forbid them from loading more than seven bullets in to them. meanwhile, also in new york, vice president biden today pledged to keep fighting for an assault weapons ban, even though fellow democrat harry reid is moving a bill forward without him. president obama's healthcare reform law turns three years old saturday. tonight, chief national correspondent jim angle tells us what we have seen so far. >> though obamacare opportunity fully take effect until january, parts of it are already in place, supporters, of course, point to the benefits. >> already more than 3 million young americans gain coverage through their parent's plan. preventive coverage free for tens of million of americans. >> children now have coverage. february they have a preexisting condition, children can stay on the parents' plan u
] >>> laws designed to combat voter fraud are popular with one particular demographic, the one that lost the white house in november. today, those forces are arguing before the supreme court that an arizona voter fraud law is so important its stringent documentation requirements so necessary that we should forget that federal law trumps state law. indeed. to understand, just how popular these laws are with conservatives, watch how the crowd at cpac responded to south carolina governor nikki haley when she mentioned her own state's voter fraud law. >> every election in our state now requires photo i.d. before you vote. >> joining us now is democratic congressman elijah cummings of maryland. welcome, sir. >> it's good to be with you. >> what is your response, sir, to hearing the crowds cheer like that for voter i.d. laws? because that line about voter fraud got a bigger response even than her line trashing the affordable care act. >> first of all, martin, i believe that voting is a right. and it's something that is afforded to all of our citizens and we should not be doing anything to prev
your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. [ male announcer ] book ahead and save up to 20 percent at doubletree.com, so you can sit back, relax and enjoy. doubletree by hilton. where the little things mean everything. accomplishing even little things can become major victories. i'm phil mickelson, pro golfer. when i was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis, my rheumatologist prescribed enbrel for my pain and stiffness, and to help stop joint damage. [ male announcer ] enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. you should not start enbrel if you have an infection like the flu. tell your doctor if you're prone to infections, have cuts or sores, have had hepatitis b, have been treated for heart failure, or if you have symptoms s
. currently, it is against the law to purchase a gun if you are a criminal or have a dangerous record but not all require background checks. democrats are trying to put forward a bill that requires universal background checks. that has been the top priority for president obama. this bill will not include the assault weapons ban, which would ban certain types of high- capacity assault rifles and other weapons. there was not enough support in the senate to feel like that was possible to include and be able to pass the floor in the senate. it is a bit of a blow to the president agenda. host: here is the headline in the "washington post" -- how significant is it that the lead democrats and the senate is coming up with something and is going to move forward? it is significant that it is harry reid. prided himself on the support he received from the nra. he was able to use the support of gun rights groups to defeat in aepublican opponents difficult race. he has been reluctant to support gun control throughout the years. since the newtown shooting, he has been largely silent on the issue. it
and advocates are warningave major cultural shift if marriage equality becomes part of the law of the land. >> i wish it were just about the marriage altar. it is about much more. it's about altering all of society, with marriage goes what our children for taught, parents losing the right to define the morals for their children. it's about religious freedom. they are intertwined in our culture. it's about the right to conduct yours business as you see fit. >> support for same-sex marriage has groab, but it's favored by less than half, 49% of registered voters. one of the attorneys arguing for marriage equality this week says he thinks his side will win and it won't be close since he says, marriage is a civil right. >> we are not asking for a new constitutional right. the constitutional right to marry is well established. in fact, the supreme court has ruled you can't take away the right to marry, even from imprisoned felons who can't have procreation because they can't get together. but you can't take it away because it's so important, it's a fundamental right of liberty. >> there could be firew
that the job market out there. be the even more fearful than during the recession, which is the law. they're even less like a quit even though we should've expected a big increase in the recovery started. the more reason you can get that water level up even though you're adding a slaughter is because the number of jobs in terms of points is even lower than normal. one measure of how hard it is is to get the number of hires each month compared to the number of people unemployed and looking as well as the number of people who lived given up looking for work. you can see how the ratio has gone up and pretty much been stuck since 2009. we haven't really seen the number of jobs out there matching the number of people who are looking for work. and that gives you some idea of why this quit rate has not gone up, white state so though. people have said good idea of how hard it is to go and find a job. there's two groups of people being hurt the most. people at 55 and they basically lose their jobs there's a lot of trouble trying to find it and also very young people who are in train the job market
stricter gun control laws in a lot of places, in western states that are supposedly so libertarian and free-wheeling. i think it's going to be a long haul. i'm glad we have a billionaire on this issue. >> did you notice colorado what it did last week? a gun state, a hunting state. once reliably red. a transformational change. >> i think colorado is a good example. i grew up in that state, it definitely is a hunting-friendly state. i only lived in sweet states, strategic. >> there's some ohio blood in there? >> i'm going to move there for a while so i can say, i used to live in ohio, it's a swing state. you're seeing it in colorado where this is going. states are responsive on a local level. politics is all about pressure and leverage. for somebody like a mary landrieu, she doesn't see as a national poll as necessarily the pressure that's going to change her election. she's worried about louisiana. she's worried about getting re-elected in that state. and until you see the zeitgeist change within the state, these politicians are not responsive to that. where bloomberg can make a huge differe
. that is under current law, the law the president supports. he changed to make that, so it is financially feasible. our program would move us in the direction of premium support, which is what members of congress have. it will allow for a certain amount of money subsidy, a benefit check, if you will, for seniors to be able to utilize that to purchase what they want for themselves so they are able to have an insurance program that is much more responsive to them. as a physician, medicare patients are having a whale of a time finding doctors to take medicare. if you are a new medicare patients and your doctor prior to the agencies the five does not take medicare patients, you have a very difficult time finding a new dr. who will take a new medicare patient. one out of every three doctors in this country have limited the number of patients they are seeing. see no of every eight medicare patients at all. the program is flawed and needs to be reformed. we need to strengthen medicare. our guest,rice is republican of georgia. we are talking about budgetary matters. the numbers are on the screen.
and though many key parts of the health care law don't go into effect until next year, many americans are already feeling the impact of the changes to the nation's health care system. let's check in now with a checkup on obama care. >> reporter: dueling opinions in washington today on the impact of obama care and whether it's been a boon or a boondoggle to americans and american businesses. obama says it protects americans from insurance companies and says the slaw saving people money. the president said in a statement, millions of americans are saving $600 a year on prescription drugs. millions of young people have beenable to stay on their family's health plan to age 26. preventive care, like mammograms for women and wellness visits for seen, i don't covered free of charge. most importantly, for the sake of our fiscal future, the growth of health care costs is beginning to slow. but the democratic-controlled senate voted early this week to repeal part of obama care, passed with bipartisan support. they repealed a tax on medical devices that would have increased the costs we all pay
the law. they approved a bill for everyone last month. it's up for a vote in the senate in april. right now people are lining up outside the supreme court trying to get front row seats to history. the court tackles same-sex marriage in less than two days. justices will hear arguments for the first case on tuesday involving california's proposition 8, the ban on same-sex marriage. the second strs on the defense of marriage act which defines marriage as between a man and a woman. cnn.com has been covering this very extensively. john, you recently followed some gay couples. i looked at some videos you had this morning, trying to get married in mississippi, a state that bans same-sex marriage. here's a clip of that. >> this application is a record, and it is a permanent record. but we're showing it's denied. >> i can't imagine what it might be like to be in your position, to have to tell people who clearly have a home together, share things and love each other -- >> i appreciate you all -- >> that's part of a story on cnn.com by john sutter. also with us is ryan anderson of the heritage fou
challenges for law enforcement as they have no profile and their experiences and motives are also -- are often distinct. for a moment, i would like to discuss the cyber threat, which has evolved over the past decade. cyber criminals have become increasingly adept at exploiting weaknesses in our networks, and once inside, they can infiltrate government and military information, as well as our valuable and -- intellectual property. organized criminal act cyber send the kids and in deal -- ideologically driven activist groups. willieve the cyber threat be cool or eclipse the terrorist threat in the future. we are enhancing our capabilities. we have focused our cyber division on addressing computer intrusions and network attacks. each of our offices have become cyber task forces. we're cloud there -- collaborating and sharing with our federal partners more than ever in the context of a national cyber joint task force, which has 19 military, law- enforcement agencies working together to stop current attacks and prevent them in the future. we also recognize that the private sector is th
and law enforcement can work together on measures that will ensure that certain operators are being a bit more responsible because that creates an issue for everyone else and i think that is where i hope that we go. >> anything else? and by the way, i think who knew that three harvard law grads would be so interested in this issue. i think that is president chiu noted that. >> is there any, anything else that chief? >> no, i think that complete agreement here. we all want to see the city prosper, and the clubs do well, and do the safely and responsibly. >> i think that we are working towards that goal and working closely with the entertainment in doing it. >> why don't we open it up to public comment. any member who would like to speak, please come forward. >> hello, i am stephanie grain berg and i am here representing the cpab as well as the neighbors which is a neighborhood association (inaudible) ininclusive of the troubled long troubled broad way corridor. first of all, thank you for having this hearing, i think that it is very, very important. i am here really to request or plead, if
husband john quincy adams and the complex relationship with her mother-in-law, abigail adams. we will include your questions and comments by facebook and twitter tonight. >> the republican party released a plan this morning for its approach to the next presidential election that deals with attracting minority and women voters. announced this. these comments are just under one hour. >> i appreciate that introduction. thank you for the introduction of in welcoming us to the press club. i know most of you came for eggs and coffee but thank you for staying for the speech. i want to recognize our co- chair sharon day and are treasurer tony day. day. our treasurer tony all, i you and most of want to think and how grateful i am to this opportunity project. their work cut brings us here today. i want to introduce them this morning. henry barbara of mississippi, glenn mccall of south carolina, former whitew, and house press secretary ari fleischer. when republicans lost in november, it was a wake-up call. in response, i initiated the most public and most, free handson if post election rev
with those individuals. we abide by the open records laws, and the sunshine laws and i think in san francisco we haven't talked to the city attorney about that or your counsel about that but the open records laws and sean -- sunshine laws protect them up to appointment so we're not in a situation where every transmission of information is available to the general public. if that is the case or that becomes the case then we change the strategy around a little bit so we can help to protect the identity of the candidates, not necessarily the backgrounds, but the identity of the candidates by still abiding by those laws. >>i think one of the strengths of your team is the tremendous community involvement and searches that you done. i find it interesting to the work you did in l.a. and many nonprofits. my hope is as our diverse communities expect topnotch transportation selection processes like this that we can involve them in as many of the aspects of the profile and the competencies that we can and i welcome a number of stakeholder groups and give you the recommendations as we sit do
the top union protests. in michigan, they're mad about a right to work law that starts next week. and in washington, they're mad about all of the automatic spending cuts they say will get worse every week. but with right to work states adding more jobs and with many in the government looking to cut more spending, is it time tore unions to simply get with the program? charles payne, dagen mcdowell, adam lashinsky, charlie gas pregas-- gasperino. >> and with the. >> i love the big raps. >> and communities with fewer presence of unions are doing better communities and businesses. the they drove hostess out of business and they have to figure out the dynamics. they've got to take a step back, we're trying to benefit and not in it for ourselves and the message doesn't get across anymore. >> neil: dagen? >> this is evidence of unions on the run. if you look at michigan, a huge move that that state, kind of the birth of unions as we know it in this country, is now a right to work state, but what you see -- you're starting to see the down and dirty tactics. a lot of unions in that state
movement. a year later, a couple in minnesota was denied a marriage license because state law limited marriage to persons of the opposite sex. their case made to the u.s. supreme court back in 1972. it was dismissed without so much as a written opinion. the court ruled that same sex couples have no constitutional rights married and that the legal challenge itself failed to raise a substantial federal question at all. but the struggle continued. it would be another 14 years before the supreme court would issue a major ruling on civil rights for gay americans in bour versus hard wig. in the summer of 1982, michael baurs was arrested and charged by atlanta police by committing a private act with another adult man in his own bedroom. his case made it to the high court in 1986 where georgia's law criminalizing adult gay male couples for engaging in private consensual sexual acts was upheld. it was not until 203 that that decision was overruled when the court recognized the constitutional right to privacy for lesbian and gay individuals. the struggle still continues. ten years after bowers,
. with today's announcement, this stop is now protected by law. so generations of americans can remember those struggles and those sacrifices. we need to remember the past so we can address the problems of the president. a program is put in place to help the legacy of slavery. this comes week after the law designated to protect minority rights in some places with an ugly history. today we also learned that a democratic governor in arkansas had to veto republican voter i.d. bill to become a state law. these are serious cases and serious issues. issues born from our past. the great southern writer willi william faulkner wrote he, the past is not dead. it's not even past. we must not forget the struggles that continue today. and we must muster courage, imagine the courage it took for tubman to keep going back in the south, possibly being captured or killed. we don't need that much courage, just some of that courage. we'll face the deals that are trying to be cut to turn the clock back on progress in america. we all need to have a little tubman in us. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardbal
of what happened nobody has any idea what motivated this murder. law enforcement said they're not jumping to conclusions whether his job or his job as second in command of state prisons in missouri before he came to colorado, whether any of those job titles had anything to do with his murder last night. they said they're keeping an open mind as to the possibility that what he does for a living had nothing to do with why he was killed. but in response to the killing, at what is already a heightened time of political tension in the state, colorado officials have responded by increasing security for other top government officials in the state. they have also increased security at the governor's mansion. this is happening in colorado at an already heightened time. the colorado legislature has been debating and passing gun reform legislation and that debate has been unusually contentious. they have pledged on the floor of the senate that they will disobey them. they will disobey the state's new laws. democratic lawmakers have received threats for their support of gun reform. criminal charges h
the governor of colorado signed an important gun safety bill into law, a series of bills into law. the new laws limit ammunition magazines and requires universal background checks to be paid for by gun customers themselves. they followed new york who just over a month ago became the state with the toughest gun laws in the country. outlawing magazines with more than seven rounds and gun safety is a national problem but the states are leading the way. none more than the state of new york. joining me now is the man who played the pivotal role in getting those laws passed, new york state attorney general eric schneiderman. mr. attorney general, welcome back to the show. you had a top law enforcement official in one of the biggest states in the country. tell us how you managed to get things done what congress so far has not been able to do. >> i think we ought to give credit to my colleagues in government and really on a bipartisan basis in new york, i think people seized the political moment. it was a galvanizing force and the bill that the governor and senate and assembly passed and i'm now defend
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